Tag Archives: discovery

Cosmic Rain

After 14 years, I have relocated an article I read in the Washington Post one afternoon while attending college.  I was standing in my boyfriend’s living room, and I couldn’t sit down I was so excited.  But I laid it down and forgot to keep the paper.  Over the years, I tried to find the article again using search terms on Google and by writing to the Washington Post, with no luck.  Now that I have fortunately relocated the documentation of this important story, I would like to spread the word.  I think this information profoundly changes the world-view that American teenagers of my generation were taught in high school science and has far-reaching implications for human perception and experience.

In 1986, scientist Louis A. Frank released his findings to NASA that house-sized frozen water droplets are and always have been raining down into Earth’s atmosphere from Space.  The 40-foot wide “snowballs,” as the scientific community refers to them, were previously undetected with the instruments available due to the relative size and speed of the droplets.  The discovery was confirmed with further research, however.

The significance of this relatively new-found fact is that our planet’s water cycle is not closed, as our text books diagrammed with colorful cartoons, but open to space.

Essentially, then, little wet vehicles for all manner of materials enter our atmosphere daily.  I’ve come across numerous theories of Earth’s seeding from Cosmic origins, but what about yesterday, tomorrow, today?  Where did the last rainstorm over your town come from?  What might it have carried to your local soil, plant communities and crops, drinking water?

The relatively small comets Louis A. Frank discovered are mostly water, but it seems overwhelmingly obvious that an incalculable variety of organic and inorganic material is arriving in the cosmic rain we’re getting, especially since these water comets apparently helped Earth form its oceans.

It is a fact that on Earth rain clouds form when water vapor attracts to bits of grit and dust in the atmosphere.  Science has declared Space to be filled with dust, and ice composed of H2O has also been found (also kind of unnecessary to prove if you ask me) in numerous locations, both within our solar system and galaxy, and billions of light years away.  In my humble opinion, the question to ask is why wouldn’t Frank’s comets also be bringing us solid and probably organic particles?  I dare to say ‘probably organic’ because I think some things are just kind of obvious.  But that may just be me.

The Findhorn Foundation in Northern Scotland, famous for its spiritually-created gardens, received messages from the spirits of plants telling them that trees anchor our planet in its orbit.  Trees are able to attract rain to themselves as well via what some scientists say is an ability to create vapor flows and indigenous people say is a much deeper ‘like-attracts-like’ kind of process.  My personal experience is that trees anchor the planet energetically and also channel raw cosmic energies coming at Earth from Space in a way that disperses and sort of organizes the charge of the untamed rays into a usable form.  I have witnessed this physically as well as visually.  The founders of Findhorn received communications from the plant kingdom that corroborate this as one of the primary functions of trees.  Perhaps it could be that Planet Earth’s global forest is the magnet for the cosmic rain Frank documented.  Indeed, the research conducted surrounding his discovery perplexed the scientific community because there doesn’t seem to be any rain coming down on the moon.  The moon, of course, has no trees.

According to the Washington Post articles, thirty of the house-sized cosmic droplets hit Earth each minute, or “43,000 of these celestial snowballs arrive on Earth every day.”  It is my hope that whomever newly shares in the discovery of this awesome, mind-opening information takes a little more time and energy to observe the natural world and tune in to what s/he perceives.  I will definitely have more to share soon on this last statement.  (You can check Eco-Logic’s calendar of events for workshops.)

The original article can be read in its entirety here:  Cosmic Rain